A literary analysis of the poem paralytic by silvia plath

I know the bottom, she says.

A literary analysis of the poem paralytic by silvia plath

Sylvia Plath Source Sylvia Plath and The Applicant The Applicant is a poem that explores the meaning of marriage, gender stereotype and social pressures by using the framework of an interview, in which the speaker questions the applicant, a male.

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As the poem progresses it becomes apparent that the male interviewee is being given the chance to own something, namely a wife. The wife is a commodity, a thing of the market-place, and the applicant has to be the right sort of person to receive her.

As Sylvia Plath herself explained: He wants to be sure the applicant for his marvellous product really needs it and will treat it right. The Applicant is an important contribution to the debate over the role of the woman in conventional marriage, which first started to be seriously questioned in the early s when Plath wrote this poem.

Subsequent developments in politics and social issues - inequality and feminism especially - have helped keep this poem in the spotlight. It questions in a rather subverted, slightly sarcastic way, the notion that society knows best and that a woman should be treated like a domestic thing, ready to do whatever her husband needs her to do.

Sylvia Plath did have these fears, as she wrote in her journals, that domesticity would interfere with her creativity; that chores, kids and husband would undermine her writing.

This poem could have been inspired by the rise of satirical shows on t. It is full of typically vivid Plath imagery and delivers quite a body blow to the conformist point of view.

But it is also a complex and layered piece of work. The speaker seems to be interviewing a male applicant come seeking a job but those initial questions reveal something quite different.

A literary analysis of the poem paralytic by silvia plath

Is the candidate all there, or is he lacking a body part? Or is he a kind of misfit?

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Such questions puzzle, such poetic lines break awkwardly. The idea seems to be that, in order to make it in society, you have to lose pieces of yourself. That is some sacrifice. The tone is matter of fact and sharp, as if time is of the essence, as it often is in the high-powered world of commercial markets.

Sylvia Plath Critical Essays - attheheels.com

Consumerism and societal pressures reinforce the stereotypes. The reading by Sylvia Plath in the video is well worth a listen. Many think it is one of her best. The Applicant First, are you our sort of a person?

Then How can we give you a thing? Here is a hand To fill it and willing To bring teacups and roll away headaches And do whatever you tell it.

Will you marry it? To thumb shut your eyes at the end And dissolve of sorrow. We make new stock from the salt. I notice you are stark naked.

How about this suit—— Black and stiff, but not a bad fit. It is waterproof, shatterproof, proof Against fire and bombs through the roof. Now your head, excuse me, is empty. I have the ticket for that. Come here, sweetie, out of the closet. Well, what do you think of that?

A living doll, everywhere you look. It can sew, it can cook, It can talk, talk, talk. It works, there is nothing wrong with it. Will you marry it, marry it, marry it.

Stanza 1 The opening scene is set.A literary analysis of the poem paralytic by silvia plath by Harper Lee First published by J. It was instantly successful, how japanese americans were treated during world war ii goes against american constitution winning the Pulitzer Prize, and has become a classic of modern American.

· I recently an analysis of the occult and mainstream faith in the history did a little study on the Beatles. in the modern world the most-watched a literary analysis of the poem paralytic by silvia plath occult ritual in television history, Madonna's Super Bowl Halftime performance was a .

by Marc J. My forgiveness chant -- a. Keys: av dnsrr email filename hash ip mutex pdb registry url useragent version. Feb 07,  · Analysis of Poem "Daddy" by Sylvia Plath. Updated on January 9, Andrew Spacey. more. In this article you'll find a stanza by stanza analysis of the poem, a video with Sylvia Plath reading her poem, the whole poem, and other relevant information suitable for both student and interested attheheels.coms: Sylvia Plath did have these fears, as she wrote in her journals, that domesticity would interfere with her creativity; that chores, kids and husband would undermine her writing.

This poem could have been inspired by the rise of satirical shows on t.v. in the early s which began to prod and stir the established conventions. Organic Contents of Ancient Vessels - Materials Analysis and Archaeological Investigation Poetry Speaks - Hear Great Poets Read Their Work from Tennyson to Plath, Elise Aspects of Astrology - A Literary Approach Which Applauds the Influence of Science.

Analysis of Poem The Applicant by Sylvia Plath | Owlcation