An analysis of the fellowship of the rings by j r r tolkien

Life in industrial Birmingham, England, contrasted dramatically with his exotic birthplace. When the family converted to Catholicism, a faith that Tolkien followed throughout his life, relationships with his extended family suffered. When he was twelve, his mother died of diabetes, at the time an untreatable illness. At sixteen, Tolkien met Edith Bratt, a fellow orphan who would later become his wife, but his guardian, Father Francis Morgan, ordered him not to see her until his twenty-first birthday.

An analysis of the fellowship of the rings by j r r tolkien

The Lord of the Rings J. A leading philologist of his day, Tolkien was an Oxford University professor who, along with Oxford colleagues C.

Lewis and Charles Williams, helped revive popular interest in the medieval romance and the fantastic tale.

The J.R.R. Tolkien Adaptations - A Critical Analysis - HeadStuff

Tolkien gained a reputation during the s and s as a cult figure among youths disillusioned with war and the technological age; his continuing popularity evidences his ability to evoke the oppressive realities of modern life while drawing audiences into a fantasy world.

Plot and Major Characters The Lord of the Rings charts the adventures of the inhabitants of Middle Earth, a complex fictional world with fantastical characters and a complete language crafted by Tolkien.

Taken together, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, along with its prelude The Hobbit —which is based on bedtime stories Tolkien had created for his children—encompasses ten thousand years of Middle Earth history and includes an encyclopedic mythology inspired by but entirely separate from that of the human species.

Peopled with a vast array of beings, including hobbits, elves, dwarves, and orcs, as well as the men of Westernesse, Middle Earth is arguably the most comprehensive imaginary world created by a writer in English, other than John Milton's heaven and hell. While not technically a part of The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, which is considered a children's story and lacks much of the psychological depth of the trilogy, begins the story of the rings with the reluctant efforts of a hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, to recover a treasure stolen by a dragon.

During the course of his mission, the hobbit discovers a magical ring which, among other powers, can render its bearer invisible. The ability to disappear helps Bilbo fulfill his quest; however, the ring's less obvious faculties prompt the malevolent Sauron, Dark Lord of Mordor, to seek it.

The hobbits' attempt to deny Sauron unlimited power is the focal point of the Lord of the Rings trilogy, which consists of the novels The Fellowship of the RingThe Two Towersand The Return of the King In these books Bilbo's nephew Frodo takes over the elderly Bilbo's quest, as Bilbo passes the ring on to Frodo in the opening scene of The Fellowship of the Ring.

At this point the wizard Gandalf, who orchestrates many of the adventures in Middle Earth, tells Frodo that the ring has far more important powers than he suspects—that it may, in fact, hold the key to the world's fate.

Throughout the trilogy, Tolkien rejects such traditional heroic attributes as strength, size, and bravado. Instead, he has Gandalf deliberately choose the reluctant hobbit heroes, who are small, humble, and unassuming, to guard the ring and thereby prevail against evil.

Major Themes Despite Tolkien's protests to the contrary, The Lord of the Rings does evoke themes both from earlier literary archetypes and the development of modern culture in the twentieth century. Tolkien's work as an Oxford scholar of early literature suggests that he, perhaps even subconsciously, was influenced by the adventure and mythology of these texts.

But The Lord of the Rings also appears to address issues specific to the twentieth century, particularly the sense of loss, despair, and alienation that came as a result of the two World Wars.

Many have read the trilogy as an allegory of the history of modern Europe, especially the rise of Adolf Hitler and Nazism in Germany. Others see it as a Christian allegory.

An analysis of the fellowship of the rings by j r r tolkien

Tolkien always denied that his books were either allegorical or topical in nature, maintaining that the events that occurred in Middle Earth predate any historical occurrences that Western humans could be aware of. Nevertheless, most critics find that, particularly because The Lord of the Rings was written roughly between and and because of Tolkien's own experiences serving in World War I, the influence of the catastrophic events of the twentieth century must have been inevitable.

While some reviewers expressed dissatisfaction with the story's great length and one-dimensional characters, the majority enjoyed Tolkien's enchanting descriptions and lively sense of adventure. Religious, Freudian, allegorical, and political interpretations of the trilogy soon appeared, but Tolkien generally rejected such explications.

Interest in The Lord of the Rings was renewed in the early twenty-first century, with the release of a series of award-winning films based on the novels.Essay about J.R.R Tolkien and The Fellowship of the Ring Words 4 Pages John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, better known as J.R.R.

An analysis of the fellowship of the rings by j r r tolkien

Tolkien, was born on January third in Bloemfontein South Africa and was the son of Arthur and Mabel Suffield Tolkien. Essay on The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R.

Tolkien Words | 5 Pages. The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien Lord Acton once said, "Power corrupts, but absolute power corrupts absolutely." He was probably referring to the powerful kings and queens who held power over many people.

J.R.R. Tolkien was a philology scholar who wrote prolifically about the nature of medieval English and its literature. He translated works like the Arthurian legend of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight as well as the middle English 16 th Century standard Beowulf.

The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy is a testament to the man’s passion for mythology. As was also the case with his zeal for philology, Tolkien utilized elements of mythology to reinvent the past, creating a living, breathing, nearly.

The Lord of the Rings J. R. R. Tolkien The following entry presents criticism on Tolkien's trilogy The Lord of the Rings (). A leading philologist of his day, Tolkien was an Oxford University professor who, along with Oxford colleagues C.

J.R.R. Tolkien

S. Lewis and Charles Williams, helped revive popular interest in the medieval romance and the fantastic tale. J.R.R. Tolkien was motivated by different elements in his life to write The Lord of the Rings.

Tolkien was an admirable British writer and scholar best known for the author-illustrated children’s book The Hobbit and its adult sequel The Lord of the Rings (O’Neil ).

J.R.R. Tolkien Biography